1970 Ranchero build - first ranchero, first restoration

Discussion in 'The Stable' started by 1970Ranchero, Sep 22, 2020.

  1. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    I also thought of the possibility of incorrect rings. IIRC, they should be 'chevron' o-rings, not common donut-type.
     
  2. 1965 Ranchero 66G

    1965 Ranchero 66G In Maximum Overdrive Unubtanium Member

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    Just an after thought but have you checked the flaring on the end of the lines for cracks or uneven seating.
     
  3. 1970Ranchero

    1970Ranchero In Second Gear

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    Thanks, everyone. I double checked today by pumping the brakes as the car was running. Sure enough, a steady run of fluid is coming out of the pressure switch port. All the other fittings are bone dry with no leaks.

    Basstrix, I am going to take your advice and give rebuilding it myself a shot. I agree that one of the best parts of doing it yourself is being able to fully understand how it goes together. Makes fixing future issues down the road easier.

    And thanks again for the offer, Andy. I will try my hand at rebuilding it, but might be taking you back up on that offer (if its still open) if I need to be bailed out a third time! :eek:
     
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  4. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    Okay, that's fine. When you do it, what I do is I cut/tear a long, thin strip of fine crocus cloth (not sandpaper), then I wrap it lengthwise around a round piece of steel stock or, in a pinch, a rat tail file, and I sand the bore carefully, lengthwise, with a corkscrew twist in both directions. Go easy, take your time; it's almost like honing the bore. Then, use fresh brake fluid to wash particles out of the bore, followed by a water rinse and compressed air dry. When you're ready to install the piston, dribble fresh brake fluid into the bore, and a few drops on each o-ring before assembly. Take your time, and hopefully, this will come out leak-free.
     
  5. 1970Ranchero

    1970Ranchero In Second Gear

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    The distribution block has been rebuilt and put back in.

    Regarding bleeding the brakes - how do I purge the air that entered the system when the distribution block was out?

    Do I have to rebleed the whole system to make sure no air is anywhere in the lines? Thanks everyone!

    I just bought a vacuum bleeder so I can do it myself
     
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  6. Jeff B

    Jeff B In Maximum Overdrive BRONZE MEMBER

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    For sure bleed the entire system. Start with the right rear then left rear. Then right front and then left front.
     
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  7. Hillbilly

    Hillbilly In Maximum Overdrive

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    Bleed the entire system. Right rear first, then left rear. Next do the right front followed by the driver's side front. Wait a few days then do it all over to insure you get any trapped air out of the system. Works better if you can find a helper to follow your instructions to push the brake pedal and hold it down untill you say to release pressure on the pedal. Vacume bleeder is good to get fluid into the lines but the helper method is more complete.
     
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  8. 1965 Ranchero 66G

    1965 Ranchero 66G In Maximum Overdrive Unubtanium Member

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    I still like the the one person self bleeders.
     
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  9. uk ranchero

    uk ranchero In Third Gear

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    not seen them for years over here. i will have to get some for next time i need to do a brake job
     
  10. 1970Ranchero

    1970Ranchero In Second Gear

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    Thanks, everyone. I tried a cheapo vacuum bleeder but I could get a good enough seal/vacuum to circulate the fluid. Looks like I am enlisting help!
     
  11. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    The brakes, do you have front discs? If so, you need to pull the piston in the proportioning valve out slightly in order to facilitate bleeding using either a vacuum or pressure bleeder. If you use one or the other, your bleed sequence is LF/RF/LR/RR. Two-person pressure bleeding is in reverse of that.
     
  12. Basstrix

    Basstrix In Maximum Overdrive BRONZE MEMBER

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    I'm curious to know which one you tried? Was it the version with hand pump or one that uses compressed air?
     
  13. 1970Ranchero

    1970Ranchero In Second Gear

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    It was a $50 Mityvac handpump from NAPA.
     
  14. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    Mityvac is pretty good; but the problems with vac and pressure bleeders is the bleeder valve threads. One technique I use with vacuum bleeding is to first open the bleeder and allow it to gravity bleed; that tells me there is fluid in the line all the way to the cylinder or caliper. Then, I remove the bleeder screw, put the vacuum line against the hole and pull vacuum. Once the air bubbles are gone, quickly put the bleeder screw back in. Then, after topping off the fluid, crack the bleeder barely open, and pull vacuum on it again and close the valve.
     
  15. Basstrix

    Basstrix In Maximum Overdrive BRONZE MEMBER

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    Andy, I agree with you on what the problem is. My remedy has been to carefully apply a couple of wraps of the thicker teflon tape to the threads. You don't want any shards getting into whatever you're bleeding and you don't put it over the smooth conical part that forms the sealing surfaces. I use the thick tape that the pros use..that cheap thin stuff shreds too easy. I've see bleeders that actually have a o-ring built in for just this purpose. They even sell them with sealant pre-applied for this purpose. 2022-03-12 09_13_13-Amazon.com_ Dorman Help! 12701 Speed Bleeder 38-24X1.19 _ Automotive - Brave.jpg
     
  16. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    OOH, I hadn't seen those, but I'd still pull the bleeders to help move the fluid faster. Otherwise, that is the best I've seen so far.

    And as far as Teflon tape goes, I applied so much to the NATO Seasparrow's systems on my ship, I can work with any thickness, and ensure I don't get it where it doesn't belong.
     

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