2002 Ranger A/C

Discussion in 'General Automotive Questions' started by Clark, Jun 15, 2022.

  1. Clark

    Clark In Maximum Overdrive

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    The A/C in my 2002 Ranger, 3.0L, is working for short periods either cooling fine or not blowing air out the vents. I would assume the evaporator is freezing up and the system needs freon.

    I put my gauge set on the system and read 100 psi on both the low and high pressure sides and, hence, cannot add freon.

    So what does this mean? I've been told the compressor is worn out but it will cool at times. Any thoughts on this?
     
  2. pmrphil

    pmrphil In Maximum Overdrive GOLD MEMBER

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    Have you cleaned the living death out of the condenser? I have found many vehicles which needed it badly and AC worked afterward. Well worth a shot.
     
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  3. 1965 Ranchero 66G

    1965 Ranchero 66G In Maximum Overdrive Unubtanium Member

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    From old school I would say orifice tube, the high side is low and low side should be at around 35.
     
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  4. Clark

    Clark In Maximum Overdrive

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    Yes, I'm thinking the orifice tube is probably plugged; hence, the high low side pressure.
     
  5. plumcolr

    plumcolr In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    Did you get that 100/100 reading with the compressor running (clutch actually engaged)?
    A/C (and heat) can do funny things with an underhood vacuum leak. If the air (vents) work under high vacuum but not under advanced throttle you may have a bad hose between the vacuum reservoir and the vent vacuum actuator. If the orifice is plugged you should see a difference in high side and low side pressure when you firs turn the air on until the high limit turns the compressor off.
     
  6. Clark

    Clark In Maximum Overdrive

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    This is strange. The A/C works nicely about half the time. No air blowing the other half. No difference under high or low vacuum conditions.

    I really need to check this all out again when I have a bit more time to be sure the compressor was running. I'm wondering what the A/C pressures should be with the compressor in an off state.
     
  7. 1965 Ranchero 66G

    1965 Ranchero 66G In Maximum Overdrive Unubtanium Member

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    Equalized, it would be the same pressure on both high and low which probably why the same reading, as plumcolr stated, verify clutch is engaged and compressor is turning. If not I would guess low freon or bad low pressure cut off switch.
     
  8. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    Pressure depends on air temperature. This chart gives pressures for low and high sides during operation.

    PSX_20220618_210250.jpg
     
  9. Clark

    Clark In Maximum Overdrive

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    I rechecked the pressures and match the chart. NOW I find there must be an in-cab air flow problem - quite sensitive to vacuum conditions. I started the truck this morning and very little air flow out of the vents. Then suddenly full cold air flow. I don't see a vacuum reservoir under the hood like my Ranchero so have yet to understand this one.
     
  10. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    It isn't the same...no soup can for you!:D

    It's a spherical black plastic tank with two nipples and two feet for mounting, and I believe it's on the driver fender well, next to the fuse box. I've screenshot some pages you'll need for basic diagnosis, but I have to reduce their size first before posting them, which I'll do in a PM.
     
  11. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    NM, I forgot that files can't be uploaded in Conversations.
    Anyway, I left some operation info up there, and here are the photos:

    PSX_20220621_120313.jpg

    PSX_20220621_120336.jpg

    PSX_20220621_120359.jpg

    PSX_20220621_120444.jpg

    PSX_20220621_120508.jpg

    PSX_20220621_120532.jpg

    Hopefully, you'll get this problem diagnosed. I've been dealing with my friend's Comanche pickup that we retrofitted A/C into, and it's doing the same thing, the vacuum isn't working correctly.
     
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  12. Clark

    Clark In Maximum Overdrive

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    I checked. No vacuum reservoir under the hood for this 2002 Ranger. I was hoping they quit using vacuum motors by 2002. I do have the shop manuals which clearly I need to read.
     
  13. Hillbilly

    Hillbilly In Maximum Overdrive

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    If it has vacuum operated air doors, it likely does have a vacume reservoir hidden somewhere. It could be done similar to Fox Body Mustangs or Thunderbirds, the reservoir could be hidden under the front fenders with the fender inner liner obscuring your view of it. Or possibly it could be using a reservoir like on my TownCars. They have the reservoir built into an electrical relay holding box, clever design that hides the vacuum hose under the relay wiring. What I'm saying is the reservoir may be hiding in plain sight, not a conventional old school shape you would know by sight. I would start checking at all the connections to the intake manifold then follow all the lines.
     
    The Wrench and 1965 Ranchero 66G like this.
  14. Jeff B

    Jeff B In Maximum Overdrive BRONZE MEMBER

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    Ford also used plastic hard lines for vacuum and they will crack or break leaving a leak. Harder to trace too. If you have that tubing and find a bad spot, cut it out and replace the section with good ol' rubber vac tubing. Now would be a good time to have a hand powered vacuum pump.
     
  15. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    I found this on YouTube, it should answer any questions and give some guidance:

     
  16. plumcolr

    plumcolr In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    You'll need to follow the vacuum from the intake manifold. Some fords have a fitting on the power brake booster which has nultiple ports. Most 2000 and newer fords that I have seen have a vacuum canister tucked in the passenger fender by the firewall. Just look at all the (ugh! plastic) lines you can see along the firewall. Be prepared to replace ALL of them with good ol' rubber lines.
     
  17. plumcolr

    plumcolr In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    Another possibility if this ranger has IWE type 4wd is a bad line to the wheels. I kinda doubt it has IWE tho.
     
  18. Clark

    Clark In Maximum Overdrive

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    Ok, studied this some more. Under poor vacuum conditions, the air flow defaults to the defroster vents - exactly what I have and failed to notice. I also found the vacuum reservoir hidden under the intake air filter box. Now to check for vacuum leaks!
     
  19. LSChero

    LSChero In Maximum Overdrive PLATINUM MEMBER

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    Time to build a smoke machine.If your brake bleeder has a gauge it will work,but takes longer.Dont forget to check heater control valve.
    SAM_4814.JPG
     
  20. pmrphil

    pmrphil In Maximum Overdrive GOLD MEMBER

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    Hey, my 95 F150 does that, too. Hmm. o_O
     

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