68 390GT progress

Discussion in 'Ranchero Pics' started by Unclebrad, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. ribald1

    ribald1 Banned PLATINUM MEMBER

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    I was under the impression that due to stainless 3d printing using a binder rather than actually producing a metal part, that the wear charecteristics were poor.
     
  2. Unclebrad

    Unclebrad In Third Gear SILVER MEMBER

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    That is something that I hadn't heard. Figures that there would be something about the process that isn't quite as good as other methods. Of course, for this part, wear might not be as much of an issue as strength. Know anything about that?
     
  3. Cindy

    Cindy In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    ...I never wanted a hard cover for him;rather, a basic vinyl snap-on one. However, I would forego that for those coffin moldings. I think they are the bomb!
     
  4. ribald1

    ribald1 Banned PLATINUM MEMBER

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    Bonded metal parts are as strong as plastic ones, possibly a bit stronger.
    I have heard of a process that mixes bronze with stainless and prints at the melting temp of bronze, making it as strong as bronze.
    There is also a laser based system that can melt stainless powder as it is deposited, but that is a very high end process used almost exclusivly but the military and areospace.
    As stainless melts at over 2400 degrees depending on alloy, and has to be in a non reactive atmosphere when melted to prevent the chromium from burning, I can only imagine what creating a true stainless steel 3D printer would entail.
     
  5. Cindy

    Cindy In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    Bradley, it's the collar you wanted, right? I couldn't recall what part you needed. My roommate tried to surprise me with having some work done on Cochise, but the mechanic bailed on the appointment and my roommate sucks at keeping secrets, lol.... long story short, as soon as the mechanic comes out to swap the collar etc, I'll have those parts.
     
  6. Unclebrad

    Unclebrad In Third Gear SILVER MEMBER

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    If your collar was good, I would be interested, but it seems to me that your collar was pretty badly worn as are both of mine.
    I also need a good shifter lever. Mine is really badly pitted. I have a little list of stuff that I don't have, and there is a guy up in the foothills who seems to have a fairlane/torino/ranchero wrecking yard at his place. Might have to make a trip up there before too long.
     
  7. Cindy

    Cindy In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    P.S...one of my new nicknames for you is gonna be the driveway man.......gawd that driveway is steep......laughing....
     
  8. Cindy

    Cindy In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    oh cool...I know there is an outfit in Lodi, but Ive not heard of the place you're referring to.
     
  9. Unclebrad

    Unclebrad In Third Gear SILVER MEMBER

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    My most recent "project" is the steering column shift collar repair.

    The shift lever collar was loose/wobbly, which seems to be a common issue. In fact, when I got mine apart, I found that it had been repaired with what appeared to be solder, sometime in the past. The problem is that, over the years of use, the pressure of the shift lever’s fulcrum pin, on the soft pot metal the collars are made of, distorts the holes where the pin is seated.
    IMG_4747.JPG

    I have searched for a new part for months without success, and finally resigned myself to the idea of trying to repair my old one. Since the collars are made of pot metal, and can’t be welded, solder has been pretty much the only solution, but solder is softer than pot metal, so I imagine the problem would return fairly soon. A bronze bushing would do the trick nicely, but having two little bushings installed is a little pricey for my budget. (I recently got an estimate of $200 from a local shop.)

    In my search for alternatives, I ran across a product which can be used to join pot metal pieces. It is called MuggyWeld Super Alloy 1. There is a web site – muggyweld.com – and they have lots of information and demonstration videos showing how “easy” it is to use. It is a white metal rod which is used like a brazing rod, but it melts at a much lower temp - 350 degrees – so it won’t melt the pot metal.

    I’m not even at an intermediate skill level when it comes to “welding” but I have done a little soldering, and have sweat copper pipe a few times, so I decided to take a chance for $59, and ordered some. It is actually pretty easy to use. I did an ok job the first try, and went back to touch that up the next day. Note: this product gives off very toxic fumes when it is heated, so be sure to have lots of moving air if/when you use it.

    Once I got the holes filled, I re-drilled them to the proper size for the pin.
    IMG_4742 b.jpg

    Drilling the metal, I had the sense that it had a similar hardness to the pot metal and not as soft as solder, so I am hoping to get a few extra miles out of this repair job.

    Now for a little sanding and painting, and I can put everything back together.

    Wish me luck.
     
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  10. ribald1

    ribald1 Banned PLATINUM MEMBER

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    As you have a drill press, you could do the bushings yourself.
    Set the part in the press with the holes aligned, and do not move the part or table until you are done.
    Drill the larger hole for the bushings. Either drill for interference fit or wick solder in. Set the bushings, drill them for proper size.
    Remove the part and file the bushings to size.
    Probably less than $2 in parts and an hours time.
    I have found this product works well for welding or filling in pot metal
    http://www.muggyweld.com/pot-metal-repair/
     
  11. 5.0 Chero

    5.0 Chero Bahumbug Staff Member

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    Sorry John had to point it out
     
  12. Cindy

    Cindy In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    Thats very cool, Bradley! Mine was the same way, the holes were all screwed up. Glad to know you're working on your hilltop beauty.
     
  13. Unclebrad

    Unclebrad In Third Gear SILVER MEMBER

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    Thanks Ribald,
    The bushing process sounds easier than I would have expected. Since I have already done the job using fill, I am going to use it and will wait until it wears out again. I'll go the bushings route then for certain.
     
  14. Unclebrad

    Unclebrad In Third Gear SILVER MEMBER

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    Hi Cindy,
    Yes, I am putting time in on it here and there still. I am slow, but I do manage to get things finished eventually. ;-)
    I'm not sure about painting the column and collar in this cold weather, so will probably work on something else until the weather warms a bit.
     
  15. davis

    davis In Maximum Overdrive

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    brad,
    did your shifter handle drop down from Drive to 1 without having to pull the handle back? mine does that. i'm not sure if its a shifter detent or the pin on the collar as you have fixed. i'm not quite sure whats involved removing the collar/shifter.

    thanks
     
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  16. Unclebrad

    Unclebrad In Third Gear SILVER MEMBER

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    Hi Davis,
    No, my shifter worked ok, but was a little sloppy. I wasn't always sure which gear the trans was in, but it did never dropped to a different gear.
    I actually took everything apart because I needed to get at the column bushing down at the firewall, so I could figure out how to get the neutral safety switch mounted. It was a one-thing-leads-to-another thing.
    Anyway, it is a very straight forward job, getting the collar off.
    As I recall, there is the main, large nut holding the steering wheel, then a few screws to allow the wiring contacts plate to slide off. (you can leave most of the wires connected when you slide it off the column and out of the way,) a couple nuts holding the first, short collar (I am sure it has a technical name but I'n not going to look it up) and I think that might be it.
    It is very possible that you won't have to take that last step of removing the collar. You will probably be able to see what's going on with it n place.
    Just take lots of pictures, every single step of the way, for reassembly. (I took a bunch, but really should have taken more.)
     
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  17. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    The shifter arm should have a pressure spring that holds it against the shift detent (the piece that has the shift 'profile' cut into it). If it popped out or broke, that can allow the arm to move toward you and then move up and down.
     
  18. Cindy

    Cindy In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    My shifter handle dropped, but it didn't change gears. It was just the junky old collar slipping around. Much better now, though. No more guessing whether I'm in drive or neutral, lol...
     
  19. davis

    davis In Maximum Overdrive

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    hmmm. well the shifter has the spring, the collar seems to be "tight", but if i pull out of park and drop to say reverse or drive, and then i rest my hand on the shifter again, the weight of my hand/arm will pull the shifter down to "1". sorta like a detent or a locking pall is rounded or flattened out. i did some digging on ebay and found this item(s) for detent. could this be my problem?
    thanks.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1967-67-FOR...ash=item58ecaea692:g:42kAAOSw4GVYFpem&vxp=mtr
     
  20. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    That's it, BUT, it's not a three-on-the-tree shifter. You should put it in gear then put your right hand on the steering wheel. The detent is only to prevent the arm from moving by itself. Pressure on the arm from your hand and arm's weight can/will make it slip into lower gears. I do realize people can get into bad habits (had an elderly customer who absolutely insisted his left foot needed to always be on the clutch, and later the brake, pedal because having it on the floor overstressed his left knee), but you shouldn't rest your hand on the shifter if it's an auto trans shifter.
     

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