D DAY 75th anniversary

Discussion in 'Lounge' started by FrenchFan, Jun 4, 2019.

  1. FrenchFan

    FrenchFan In Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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  2. Huevos

    Huevos In Maximum Overdrive

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    Thanks for sharing.
     
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  3. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    I wish I could be there.
     
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  4. FrenchFan

    FrenchFan In Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    You can't travel Andy ?
     
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  5. TestDummy

    TestDummy In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    Maybe he's got a tether?
     
  6. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    My tether is monetary. My niece Sarah has studied in France a few times, and on one of her trips, she visited the grave of one of our ancestors who died in the Great War, about 1 month before the Armistice. Unfortunately, she didn't have the materials to make a rubbing off the gravestone, and the photo she took disappeared with the phone she had when it came up missing on her way back to the U.S.
     
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  7. TestDummy

    TestDummy In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    I have the same one. If not for work travel, I'd be stuck in Virginia.
     
  8. Freestyle Don

    Freestyle Don In Third Gear BRONZE MEMBER

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    We just watched a documentary on HBO. Featured B17 bombers. Those crew members were courageous, mostly young men under 30. My wife`s uncle was a tail gunner on the "Fancy Nancy". He flew 25 missions over Europe and 17 over North Africa. He left her all his memorabilia including documentation of their bomb targets and his personal notes in a small pocket size notebook. He gave her a small piece of shrapnel that ended up inside his turret.
    I wish I had spent more time listening and documenting his stories!
     
  9. TestDummy

    TestDummy In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    A local historian and UVa Professor (and buddy of mine), has been taping interviews with old people here in town. If you want to talk, he wants to record it. And do they ever. He started 20 years ago when there were quite a few more WW2 vets than there are now. It was, and is, a great project.
     
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  10. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    A gal I went to high school with had a great uncle who was an AAF pilot on B-25's; his squadron was in the 17th BG, which was the group the Doolittle Raiders were from. Col. Ross Greening was the pilot of the Hari-Carrier, and his story was supposed to be the basis for "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo," but the author changed to the crew of the "Ruptured Duck." He ended up writing "Not as Briefed," which was published by his wife, and is available on Amazon.
     
  11. Doc76251

    Doc76251 In Fourth Gear

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    Sadly I think we have lost bounties of history by failing to listen to that generation when we had the chance. My Grandfather was a machinist by trade and went into the Navy after Pearl Harbor and was stationed there for the duration + 6 mos as a machinist repairing battle damage on the ships. My other Grandfather was a baker in the SeaBee's and while he never spoke of it surely saw some action in the island hopping of the Pacific. My wife's side of the family was from the "other side of the fence", Her Fathers father was a German Anti Aircraft Officer that was captured defending the the submarine pens at St. Nazaire. Her mothers father was a barber from Yugoslavia that was impressed into the German army but was removed due to his heart and unwillingness to fight, he spent 3 years in a concentration camp before he escaped and made his way from Poland back to Yugoslavia. THAT man had some stories. His wife is most impressive of all. She could take 2 potatoes, a handful of flour, pinch of salt and a couple dried plums and make a meal to die for. Upset stomach, she would rustle around her herb garden, hand you a cup of "tea" and in 15 min you would feel great. Sadly she is healthy as a horse, strong as an ox, hard headed like a mule and has lost her mind, hearing and eyesight.

    They were/are truly the greatest generation and we are lessened daily by their passing.

    Cheers,

    Doc
     
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  12. Jeff B

    Jeff B In Maximum Overdrive BRONZE MEMBER

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    There are so many stories and memories to hopefully keep anything like WWII from happening again. I was introduced to a Rabbi and his wife by my grandparents who were concentration camp survivors. They spoke of the things that went on and during the conversation they rolled up their shirtsleeves to reveal the tatoos the Nazis put on them to identify them as Jews. Still gives me chills.
     
  13. FrenchFan

    FrenchFan In Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    Andy, do you remember where the grave is located ?
     
  14. FrenchFan

    FrenchFan In Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    One of my uncles died during WWII, as far as i remember when i was a kid my grand mother told me he was missing in action in south of France, he was a paratrooper, a couple of months ago my mother turned 86 and as we were celebrating her birthday i don't know why the conversation went about her brother (my uncle).
    My mother showed us some papers about this uncle, when France was occupied by the Germans he went clandestinly to London in England to join the army, that's were he became paratrooper, i don't remember if it is just before or just after the D Day he landed in Brittany (France) with some other guys to help the French "Resistance", he and two of his comrades were injured while fighting against Germans, they were taken prisoners and executed. their bodies were never found.
    So i then learned that in fact my uncle wasn't missing in action in south of France but was executed in Brittany.
     
  15. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    I'll look it up.
     
  16. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    Darn it, I thought Mom had written the information on the back of the picture I have, which I can't upload right now as they're too large. I want to say that my late brother Geoff gave his daughter the location, as he would've got it from our grandfather's journal he kept during his time in France back then. I'll see if I can lay my hands on that journal.
     

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