Need a distributor recommendation 1969 302

Discussion in 'Ranchero Tech Help' started by Boiler92, Oct 19, 2020.

  1. cbolt

    cbolt In Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    I wound up doing a complete rewire of my car so all the connectors are brand new and pretty secure. Luckily the wiring kit I used had the proper connectors for the HEI distributor.
     
  2. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    Ah, good, I hadn't known about that.
     
  3. Boiler92

    Boiler92 In Fourth Gear SILVER MEMBER

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    This rebuild is going down a rabbit hole.

    I stopped by the machine shop last week to put a deposit down on the work. The shop requires some monies to cover parts in case the customer walks. I asked him if the block had been bored before. He said yes and showed me the pistons and cleaned up block. Pistons .030. He hadn't mic'd the cylinders yet but thought there was a chance he could get away with honing but his estimate included boring and going to 40 over shouldn't be a problem on a street driven engine.

    He texted me today and said the crank is actually a 289 crank that he was going to have to grind but it can be used no problem. I did some googling and it looks like a 289 crank in a 302 block isn't a problem or uncommon although it changes stroke, displacement, power etc.

    You never know what you're really getting when you buy something 50 years old I guess.
     
  4. beerbelly

    beerbelly In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    Did you get a chance to check the block casting numbers behind the starter? That should tell you what year and month block you have.
     
  5. Boiler92

    Boiler92 In Fourth Gear SILVER MEMBER

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    Yep. 69, 302 off the Fairlane line.
     
  6. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    I would hit up a junkyard for a 302 crank, damper and flexplate or flywheel, and sell the 289 crank to someone who needs a 289 crank. That'd keep your overall costs down, and preserve a crank that's becoming scarce.
     
  7. pmrphil

    pmrphil In Maximum Overdrive GOLD MEMBER

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    No, that's no help. The rods in a 289 are different length, can't use them with a 302 crank, while the damper and flexplate are the same. 68 model year you could get either a 289 in a 302 block, or vice versa. Compression ratio would probably be less than 2 tenths of a point of compression difference. Boiler, you should take a good look at the casting date, as the casting code can be the same for many years, usually 3 or 4 in a row.
     
  8. Boiler92

    Boiler92 In Fourth Gear SILVER MEMBER

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    When I looked these numbers up before I concluded it was a 302 manufactured in March of 69.

    18935.jpeg
     
  9. pmrphil

    pmrphil In Maximum Overdrive GOLD MEMBER

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    You are 100% correct, I would wonder if when it was rebuilt the crank was N.G. and they replaced everything with 289 innards?? Maybe get the casting number off the crank to make sure it is 289. Either way, pistons are the same for either one, they're interchangeable.
     
  10. beerbelly

    beerbelly In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    I believe a 289 crank should be marked 1M on the front throw, and a 302 marked 2M.
     
  11. Boiler92

    Boiler92 In Fourth Gear SILVER MEMBER

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    Yeah, who knows the history of this engine. It could have been bored twice before a new crank once or twice.

    It doesn't really matter to me at this point as long as it starts right up and runs smooth.

    I did notice on the block where it mates with the intake a bunch of very small indentations in an irregular pattern like someone had taken a punch or awl or drill to it for a few inches. The machinist told me that was a "redneck" attempt to stop a leak by someone who didn't know the intake gasket was supposed to be dry.
     
  12. handy_andy_cv64

    handy_andy_cv64 In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    The intake gasket does not have to be dry, and if both surfaces are smooth, it will eventually leak. I use yellow monkey snot to glue the gasket to the block (if it takes a gasket and not a bead of silicone--the rough surface or indentations help anchor the bead so it doesn't blow out), then the intake goes on dry. And as long as the PCB is clear and changed out when you throw new plugs in at 30K, then your leak problems should be minimal.
     

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