springs or struts?

Discussion in 'General Automotive Questions' started by burninbush, May 25, 2018.

  1. burninbush

    burninbush In Maximum Overdrive

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    Looking at prices on the web, replacing both spring and strut ain't that expensive, looks like you can get them as an assembled unit. I may try to make a deal with YourMechanic to replace the whole mess at once.
     
  2. Hillbilly

    Hillbilly In Maximum Overdrive

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    BB, my cousin had a similar glitch on her 04 Concord. Shop replaced the rubber isolator bisquits on top of the struts only and the problem went away. Her car is in the 80K mile area but the shop said her struts were still good. At over 100K miles you will probably be ahead replacing the struts now too. Gonna' keep that car ? Remember that the back end has hit nearly all the same bumps as the front so it might need a bit of lovin' too.
     
  3. Basstrix

    Basstrix In Overdrive BRONZE MEMBER

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    Since you're refuting well known and existing science, you should prove and publish your findings and set the new laws of physics.
     
  4. ribald1

    ribald1 In Maximum Overdrive PLATINUM MEMBER

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    As this is all science I learned and work with, it is already published in thousands of places.
    Look into vibration work hardening, and annealing metal to make bending and shaping it easier.
    I suspect you are taking a specific application and applying it globally, hence your confusion.
    In construction, things are either springs or shear. Springs carry load, shear transfers load. Even though not required from a structural standpoint, spring motion is limited to a level below what most people can perceive except as vibration.
    Also, after fires in steel structures the metal is tested to ensure that the metal has not annealed and lost it's rigidity.
    Metal is interesting stuff, from cold flow, to cold welding (used to be called marrying), to crystalizing and cracking through vibration hardening,... it is amazing stuff.
    Copper and several other metals anneal the opposite way as steel. Dry, clean stainless steel will cold weld under pressures common for steel fasteners.
    A person could devote a life to learning about metal and not know it fully before the sands run out.
     
  5. TestDummy

    TestDummy In Maximum Overdrive SILVER MEMBER

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    A fish gotta swim, some people gotta argue. Nature, at it's best.
     
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  6. burninbush

    burninbush In Maximum Overdrive

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    Well -- it just keeps going on, has not had a check light on in 4+ years. Gets ~2000 / quart of oil, so I just pour in another and change at 3000. Doesn't leak any oil. Have never had a car with this little trouble (after changing the cam sensor 3 times). I like it well enough, everything still works. I wouldn't hesitate to drive it anywhere. I suspect it has a broken rear motor mount -- thanks to my driveway for that one. If you dent a bumper on it, it fixes itself! Amazing car.
     

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